It is currently Mon Sep 25, 2017 8:45 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
 biopunk-negation: a manifesto of Anarchist neo-Luddism 
Author Message

Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 5:39 am
Posts: 2
Post biopunk-negation: a manifesto of Anarchist neo-Luddism
let me introduce myself. i am the anarcho-schizz... and you can be too. just check out my blog, read the manifesto, and throw your fucking computer out the window... or at least spend a good 60 seconds giving it the finger before continuing with whatever you were doing! ;) and remember -- biopunk-negation is the historical-cultural negation of biopunk itself. what you are witnessing is the second coming of dionysus. and he has arrived to smash the machinery of global capital!

http://biopunk-negation.blogspot.com/

sweet dreams,
the cosmic foooool


Wed May 21, 2008 6:05 am
Profile E-mail

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:19 am
Posts: 195
Location: Sweden
Post Re: biopunk-negation: a manifesto of Anarchist neo-Luddism
I enjoyed your manifesto ;)

I'd say biopunk offers tools to understand what it means to be human. You get an explanation for who you are(a product of evolution) and where you are going(nowhere in particular) and what the purpose is(there is none, nature has no purpose). On one level everything we consider to be important are kinks. They are what happen to interest us, for someone it's politics, for someone else it's sports, religion, math or philosophy. For one effeminate guy it's Britney Spears. They are all kinks, equally unimportant, nature doesn't care one way or another.

The fact that we are what evolution built means we are laced with imperfections, we are what we are because some traits were promoted by natural selection and other weren't. A lot of what we are and can do has no function in society so we feel alienated. We feel trapped and look for release - develop more kinks.

It will never be perfect. The neocortex we inherited strives for utopias, for modes of society, for patent law, for everything. There is no perfection - because we are not perfect - we are what evolution built. Full of bugs and kinks, many of them obvious. Understanding this allows the world to make sense. Biopunk shows what tools to use for patchwork if one has that particular kink.


We are what evolution built
We are not going anywhere special and there is nothing important we're supposed to do.
We are buggy and full of kinks

Knowing this our mission is obvious:
To relax and enjoy the show.
To understand what we are.
And smile.

That's all

-Splicer

_________________
We can't stop here, this is Bat Country
- Raoul Duke


Wed May 21, 2008 10:33 am
Profile

Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 5:39 am
Posts: 2
Post Re: biopunk-negation: a manifesto of Anarchist neo-Luddism
thanks, splicer, i appreciate the reply. in fact, i think it helps to illustrate more clearly where biopunk-negation fits in relation to biopunk proper. we are living in 'nihilistic' times; and, in the face of nihilism, one is faced with the dilemma of how to live one's life as a healthy and autonomous individual. but where did this cultural nihilism come from? answer: it is the historical consequence of the Death of God. and who or what killed God? the initial culprits are the french "revolutionaries" who replaced the rule of the french monarch and the catholic church with "the rule of the People" -- i.e. bourgeois democracy. but it is more complicated than this. god was progressively murdered over centuries by the so-called 'secular' society that still claimed to worship him during their 'private time.' but the Death of God is not to be mourned. god, understood as concept rather than as 'being,' has always been tyrannical.

where does 'humanity' go from here? and is 'humanity,' understood as a cohesive social body even a worthwhile concept? i, as an anarchist, have no desire to assimilate myself into an all-encompassing 'humanity.' this is why i said that "to be fully human is to be fully oneself" - i.e. fully oneself rather than a member of a 'collective' human race. people often speak of the postmodern age as an age 'without values,' but this is not exactly true. granted, the postmodern economy is without values, but not postmodern culture as a whole. (for proof of this, recall george bush's repeated use of the term 'evil-doers' in reference to islamic terrorists).

in the face of permanent global warfare, what's a 'socially conscious person' to do? does (s)he sit back and passively consume? does (s)he set out on some moral crusade of his own? or does (s)he say to herself "this death culture has nothing more to offer me" and set out to destroy it? while biopunk itself does not seem to actively propose passive consumption, it does wallow in the ethical relativism of postmodern death culture. biopunk-negation, on the other hand, sees biopunk itself in historical context and uses it as a means to different ends. whereas biopunk defines itself in relation to the culture that produced it, this is not true of biopunk-negation. i became interested in biopunk through an interest in cultural theory, but my interest in ALL of these things stems from a belief in anarchism and a desire to create anarchy. biopunk-negation is, above all, a life ethic in which individuals seek to regain control of their bodies and place those bodies in direct conflict with technological civilization.

cheers,
the Schizz


Thu May 22, 2008 1:44 am
Profile E-mail

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:19 am
Posts: 195
Location: Sweden
Post Re: biopunk-negation: a manifesto of Anarchist neo-Luddism
Quote:
we are living in 'nihilistic' times; and, in the face of nihilism, one is faced with the dilemma of how to live one's life as a healthy and autonomous individual. but where did this cultural nihilism come from? answer: it is the historical consequence of the Death of God. and who or what killed God? the initial culprits are the french "revolutionaries" who replaced the rule of the french monarch and the catholic church with "the rule of the People" -- i.e. bourgeois democracy. but it is more complicated than this. god was progressively murdered over centuries by the so-called 'secular' society that still claimed to worship him during their 'private time.' but the Death of God is not to be mourned. god, understood as concept rather than as 'being,' has always been tyrannical.

To me god is interesting from a biopunk perspective in as much as that we seem to have a need to create him. There seems to be a need for an all knowing dad who looks out for us and keeps things under control so that we don't have to grow up. Humans want others to tell them what to do, it feels good to not have responsibility(try thinking about it), to trade some freedom for lack of responsibility comes easy to us. Chomsky sees this from an anarchic standpoint and calls the phenomenon 'Looking out for number one'. He says that we do this because we are taught to do it, that we learn in school to identify special kids to obey, defend and facilitate for. The biopunk view is that it's one of the traits natural selection built in - all pack animals do the same. If you want to patch this, you have to find a way that fits with the traits built in by natural selection. We are perfectly able to come up with utopian solutions that don't fit in with the way we actually work. Those solutions function for a while under control of other traits(such as 'looking out for number one' or 'fear of death').


Quote:
in the face of permanent global warfare, what's a 'socially conscious person' to do? does (s)he sit back and passively consume? does (s)he set out on some moral crusade of his own?

The short answer is that the universe doesn't care one way or another.

If patching is your kink Chomsky gave a good example of a biopunk patch when talking about greed. His premise(again) was that we are greedy because the society highlights greed as desirable as opposed to say altruism. He pointed out that there are institutions which promote selflessness and sacrifice for unknown others and make that work too - the army being one of them. A good example is the USAF unit which rescues downed pilots whose motto is 'That others may live'. This is the opposite of greed, it also goes against 'fear of death' so how come it works? It works because 'standing in society' is a very powerful incentive especially to young men. If you are 20, being the coolest guy in your community matters... a lot. 50000 years ago - in a communty of a couple of hundred individuals - it would have gotten you laid like a rockstar(todays version of 'standing in society'). It's a good biopunk patch.

There is no way to build utopias on a biopunk foundation because nature doesn't care about what's fair or moral or ethic. Nature is amoral(not to be confused with immoral). If you organize a society along these lines it would be bliss most of the time and unbearably cruel other times. And this is as close to utopia as you can hope for.


Quote:
where does 'humanity' go from here? and is 'humanity,' understood as a cohesive social body even a worthwhile concept? i, as an anarchist, have no desire to assimilate myself into an all-encompassing 'humanity.' this is why i said that "to be fully human is to be fully oneself" - i.e. fully oneself rather than a member of a 'collective' human race.

For me biopunk is what fills the gap when you realize there is no god. Really... there is no god, utopias or other grand substitutes for perfection. One day it strikes you that are on your own, spinning through unending emptiness on your way to nowhere for no reason. There is poetry to it - but it feels like shit for a while - where go from here?
Then you notice that there are people who have bearing in this world you just stumbled into, people like Richard Feynman, Michael Shermer and countless others. They base their view of the world on experiments and the scientific method. They collide subatomic particles, see what comes out and afterwards they gaze up at the universe and understand how it works - literally. Science makes ungraspable things understandable. If you don't understand what weather is you can freak yourself out thinking about it. If you know what it is it becomes as mysterious as say an orange is - not especially mysterious. For many people today the universe feels a lot like that orange. Through history science has changed the way we look at the world many times. Biology is doing it right now. It's in the process of redefining what 'human' means. In 50 years time 'human' will mean something different from now - the same way 'earth' meant something else a hundred years ago. It's a good ride, sit back, relax, enjoy the show, participate if that's your kink.... smile.

- Splicer the Biopunk

_________________
We can't stop here, this is Bat Country
- Raoul Duke


Thu May 22, 2008 2:03 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
cron
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore.
phpBB SEO