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 Blade Runner 
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Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:19 am
Posts: 195
Location: Sweden
Post Blade Runner
There is a scene in Blade Runner I can´t find a clip of:

It's the scene where Sebastian the scientist brings home Pris, one of the female replicants:

Quote:
Pris: Must get lonely here J. F.
Sebastian: Mmm... Not really. I make friends. They're toys. My friends are toys. I make them. It's a hobby. I'm a genetic designer. Do you know what that is?
Pris: No

When inside they are greeted by two surreal small beings in costumes marching about in the dark. They are bouncing onto each other and changing directions when they hit a wall.

Quote:
Sebastian: Yoo-hoo, home again.
Toys: Home again, home again, jiggity jig. Good evening J. F.
Sebastian: Good evening, fellas.
Toy 1: Oooh!
Sebastian: They're my friends. I made them. Where are you're folks?


One of the things I enjoy in the scene is that the beings are so obviously flawed, but Sebastian likes them, he really has built them, probably a long time ago, in less skilled days, to keep him company. :lol:

Very biopunk.

I can´t find that clip, so here is another one, it's from when Deckard meets Rachel.



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Sat Mar 22, 2008 7:15 am
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Post Re: Blade Runner
It really is amazing how the Cyberpunk and Biopunk cultures are intertwined. Of course, the Cyberpunk (early, anyways) scene is nothing more than futurists who take guesses at new technologies coming (IE: Neuromancer's matrix and RL's World Wide Web) where are the Biopunk culture actually actively applauds it's 'members' to continue to break through the old notion that science (especially biological science) is for those with lots of schooling. When you've got ordinary people working and creating better ways to do stuff with biological agents than those who are 'specialized', then you know something is working.

I'm not saying the professional field is not necessary. Far from it (I don't want some kid messing around with strains of the pox), but it is helping basic biology become more prominent in the field, so to speak.

P.S~ The scene from Blade Runner you are talking about is wonderful. The whole movie is, actually.

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Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:39 am
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Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:19 am
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Location: Sweden
Post Re: Blade Runner
Sinthetik wrote:
It really is amazing how the Cyberpunk and Biopunk cultures are intertwined. Of course, the Cyberpunk (early, anyways) scene is nothing more than futurists who take guesses at new technologies coming (IE: Neuromancer's matrix and RL's World Wide Web)...

Yeah, the biological revolution stands on the shoulders of the computer revolution. I think based on what we already can tell the biological revolution will transform society more. The computer revolution is over. It doesn't hold any new unexpected novelty - like the Internet - which will fundamentally transform society. We can more or less predict what computers will bring us tomorrow. With biology we can't say that yet. We can scratch the surface and imagine what the technology can do, but it's too early to say what products of the technology which will turn out to be the defining ones 20 years from now. That is an unwritten page - like the Internet was in 1985.


Sinthetik wrote:
...Biopunk culture actually actively applauds it's 'members' to continue to break through the old notion that science (especially biological science) is for those with lots of schooling. When you've got ordinary people working and creating better ways to do stuff with biological agents than those who are 'specialized', then you know something is working.

I think that's when the good things happen. One can't beat the innovative power of young people burning for their ideas. They are the ones who come up with the novel unexpected inventions and solutions. One of my favorite examples is Jonathan Hess who created the file sharing protocol Direct Connect when he was 17. Bill Gates founded Microsoft when he was 19-20. Steve Jobs founded Apple at 21. The were all DIY:ers.


Sinthetik wrote:
P.S~ The scene from Blade Runner you are talking about is wonderful. The whole movie is, actually.

I like it too ;)

- Splicer

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Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:49 am
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